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"Ignition" Well, wow, where do I start. First, it was painful getting out of bed this morning. My alarm was set for 4:45AM. I only fell asleep last night at midnight. I debated cancelling. Seriously debated. But I had committed, and I hate backing out on a commitment. Groggy shower. Used a flashlight to find a pair of swimming trunks in the dark. Still brain-fuzzy, looking around the house for various pieces of gear. Leave the house. 6AM, Long Lake. The sky looks promising. Erykah Tam - my subject, Susan Rohac - my assistant, and I struggle down to shore with various pieces of gear. It’s 5C. None of us really want to do this. But that’s a lie - of course we do. All of us, in the water. Within minutes of setting up the sky turns more magical then I’ve seen for any creative shoot I’ve ever done in Yellowknife. And remains that way, through a shifting symphony of colour for close to an hour. All three of us, chest-deep in water. It’s freezing. At one point I accidentally submerged my lens in water. I think it’s okay but I’m not sure. Strangely, it’s warm(ish) in the water. But probably not. We’ve probably just lost all feeling. We finish and go to shore. Then it hits us, and we’re all numb and shivering. Head home. Tubs and showers. All come back to life.
"Ignition"

Well, wow, where do I start.

First, it was painful getting out of bed this morning. My alarm was set for 4:45AM. I only fell asleep last night at midnight. I debated cancelling. Seriously debated. But I had committed, and I hate backing out on a commitment.

Groggy shower. Used a flashlight to find a pair of swimming trunks in the dark. Still brain-fuzzy, looking around the house for various pieces of gear. Leave the house.

6AM, Long Lake. The sky looks promising. Erykah Tam - my subject, Susan Rohac - my assistant, and I struggle down to shore with various pieces of gear. It’s 5C. None of us really want to do this. But that’s a lie - of course we do.

All of us, in the water. Within minutes of setting up the sky turns more magical then I’ve seen for any creative shoot I’ve ever done in Yellowknife. And remains that way, through a shifting symphony of colour for close to an hour.

All three of us, chest-deep in water. It’s freezing. At one point I accidentally submerged my lens in water. I think it’s okay but I’m not sure.

Strangely, it’s warm(ish) in the water. But probably not. We’ve probably just lost all feeling. We finish and go to shore. Then it hits us, and we’re all numb and shivering. Head home. Tubs and showers. All come back to life.
So, this is pretty much the most important post I’ll write this year, or have written for a long, long time. I’ll get right to the point: we (meaning my beautiful family and I)…well, we’re moving. We’re moving away from the North: a place that’s been home and means so incredibly much to us, the place where we’ve spent the last 12 years, the place where all three children were born and raised. We’re moving to the opposite of the country. To beautiful Prince Edward Island. Why? Well, why not. Prince Edward Island has always been one of our favourite places. Being “from” Nova Scotia, it was the place that ever since my wife, Erin, and I have known each other; we’ve kind of called it “ours” when we would head over for quick mini-vacations. We’ve always loved it, and every time we go there, we think to ourselves, “wouldn’t it be great to live here some day?”  But “some day” was always this far-out thing. Never really possible, if only because we didn’t think it could be real. This summer we spent more time on Prince Edward Island. Again, after we finished up our four or five days, we both said “wouldn’t it be great to live here some day?” But this time we kind of both looked at each other, and said…..well, why not? My “job” is increasingly everywhere: my client base around the country (and the world) and with the power of the Internet, I could be based, I think, anywhere. A month ago we had zero plans to move. Wasn’t even on our radar. But now, this time, it feels so right. So we’re going to do it. We’re going to throw caution to the wind, take a risk, and move about 6000KM to the other side of the country, to tiny little Prince Edward Island. If it doesn’t work, well, Yellowknife, I might be back  But, you only live once. When? Soon. Most likely before Christmas soon. That will depend on a lot of factors, but there’s no time like the present. To my existing Northern clients – my current obligations will bring me back to the north 4-5 times in the coming year. And possibly more. At the present time, a lot of southern clients bring to me their locations. I am 100% willing to come back here, to a place I love, if you’ll have me. And for those that don’t, my studio partner, Tara Marchiori at Chasing Light Studio will give you amazing things. I’ve watched Tara totally blossom into one of the best northern professionals over the past three years and I couldn’t be more proud to call her my partner. She will carry on, here. That won’t change (unless she decides to do something equally crazy, like live in a yurt in Mongolia). To my soon-to-be East Coast home: I am so looking forward to exploring your world, a world I used to be a part of. Although I’ll be based in PEI (where exactly is yet to be determined), I will be available throughout the Maritimes (and the country, for that matter), in all the genres of photography that I’m currently passionate about, including weddings, commercial work, portraiture, editorial, and – of course – education. Don’t hesitate to contactme@davebrosha.com at any time if you have a vision (or need some help). It’s a big risk for me leaving a world I’ve built up here, but I’m excited about discovering a new one. To East Coast talent: one of the toughest things about leaving Yellowknife is that I feel like I’m part of this amazing network of artists, photographer, models, make-up artists, fashion designers, writers, musicians, etc, that feels unique and special. I want to be part of the same where you live. If you want to work together in any capacity, again, please don’t hesitate to contactme@davebrosha.com To all Northerners: you’ll forever be special to me. This place is one of the most magical places on earth. That will never leave me (and, in fact, I hope I can always have the opportunity to return, and catch up). For those who have never been to PEI: my hope is that whenever I find my base….you’ll come visit me. I’ll still be holding workshops. I plan on opening a gallery. PEI is one of the most amazing Canadian provinces, already visited by countless tourists. I hope you become one of them, and come to my world. Finally, to you all…thank you. Soon, this will be the start of the next chapter.
So, this is pretty much the most important post I’ll write this year, or have written for a long, long time.

I’ll get right to the point: we (meaning my beautiful family and I)…well, we’re moving.

We’re moving away from the North: a place that’s been home and means so incredibly much to us, the place where we’ve spent the last 12 years, the place where all three children were born and raised.

We’re moving to the opposite of the country. To beautiful Prince Edward Island.

Why? Well, why not. Prince Edward Island has always been one of our favourite places. Being “from” Nova Scotia, it was the place that ever since my wife, Erin, and I have known each other; we’ve kind of called it “ours” when we would head over for quick mini-vacations. We’ve always loved it, and every time we go there, we think to ourselves, “wouldn’t it be great to live here some day?”

But “some day” was always this far-out thing. Never really possible, if only because we didn’t think it could be real.

This summer we spent more time on Prince Edward Island. Again, after we finished up our four or five days, we both said “wouldn’t it be great to live here some day?” But this time we kind of both looked at each other, and said…..well, why not?

My “job” is increasingly everywhere: my client base around the country (and the world) and with the power of the Internet, I could be based, I think, anywhere.

A month ago we had zero plans to move. Wasn’t even on our radar. But now, this time, it feels so right. So we’re going to do it. We’re going to throw caution to the wind, take a risk, and move about 6000KM to the other side of the country, to tiny little Prince Edward Island. If it doesn’t work, well, Yellowknife, I might be back

But, you only live once.

When? Soon. Most likely before Christmas soon. That will depend on a lot of factors, but there’s no time like the present.

To my existing Northern clients – my current obligations will bring me back to the north 4-5 times in the coming year. And possibly more. At the present time, a lot of southern clients bring to me their locations. I am 100% willing to come back here, to a place I love, if you’ll have me. And for those that don’t, my studio partner, Tara Marchiori at Chasing Light Studio will give you amazing things. I’ve watched Tara totally blossom into one of the best northern professionals over the past three years and I couldn’t be more proud to call her my partner. She will carry on, here. That won’t change (unless she decides to do something equally crazy, like live in a yurt in Mongolia).

To my soon-to-be East Coast home: I am so looking forward to exploring your world, a world I used to be a part of. Although I’ll be based in PEI (where exactly is yet to be determined), I will be available throughout the Maritimes (and the country, for that matter), in all the genres of photography that I’m currently passionate about, including weddings, commercial work, portraiture, editorial, and – of course – education. Don’t hesitate to contactme@davebrosha.com at any time if you have a vision (or need some help). It’s a big risk for me leaving a world I’ve built up here, but I’m excited about discovering a new one.

To East Coast talent: one of the toughest things about leaving Yellowknife is that I feel like I’m part of this amazing network of artists, photographer, models, make-up artists, fashion designers, writers, musicians, etc, that feels unique and special. I want to be part of the same where you live. If you want to work together in any capacity, again, please don’t hesitate to contactme@davebrosha.com

To all Northerners: you’ll forever be special to me. This place is one of the most magical places on earth. That will never leave me (and, in fact, I hope I can always have the opportunity to return, and catch up).

For those who have never been to PEI: my hope is that whenever I find my base….you’ll come visit me. I’ll still be holding workshops. I plan on opening a gallery. PEI is one of the most amazing Canadian provinces, already visited by countless tourists. I hope you become one of them, and come to my world.

Finally, to you all…thank you. Soon, this will be the start of the next chapter.
"Dawn Wore A Strength"
Mi’kmaq warrior and dancer, Danny Boy Stephens, stands proud on the shores of the Great Slave Lake, Northwest Territories, Canada.Lighting info: this one was shot with one Canon 550EX speedlight, mounted on a light stand about 12-15 feet away from Danny, camera left (trigged by a Canon 580EX speedlte, on camera, acting as a master).

"Dawn Wore A Strength"

Mi’kmaq warrior and dancer, Danny Boy Stephens, stands proud on the shores of the Great Slave Lake, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Lighting info: this one was shot with one Canon 550EX speedlight, mounted on a light stand about 12-15 feet away from Danny, camera left (trigged by a Canon 580EX speedlte, on camera, acting as a master).

I am generally camera adverse in the sense that one of the reasons I love being a photographer is it means that I get to stay on “that” side of the camera. But if I’m going to show my mug, it’s going to be a good cause. I was recently “nominated” by friend Brooke Shaden Photography to participate in the #icebucketchallenge for ALS.  What is the ALS #icebucketchallenge ? Well, chances are you’ve already seen this show up on your newsfeeds. I’ve seen some amazing posts, as well as annoyed posts from people saying “so what….another internet meme….but what good does it actually do?” Well, here’s the good that it aims to do: raise awareness about ALS, and to raise funds. ALS is a horrific disease and anything that can spread awareness and raise money for one of our world’s many terrible diseases can only be a good thing. Read more about ALS here: http://www.alsa.org/about-als/what-is-als.html Raising money: you can make a direct donation here - https://secure.e2rm.com/registrant/LoginRegister.aspx?eventid=153928&langpref=en-CA&Referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.als.ca%2Fen%2Fdonate . Since this campaign has gone viral it’s raised over $10 million for ALS. This time last year, their total donations were under $100, 000. The “challenge” is that if someone nominates you, you either participate in the ice bucket challenge (which is to say you get doused by ice water so you can experience, for however slight a moment, the tiniest fraction of symptoms that a sufferer of ALS suffers - which is, as The Independent Writes, “When muscles aren’t used enough, they stop working. Sufferers begin to feel weak, especially in their arms, legs, and during speech, swallowing and breathing. As muscle tissue atrophies, limbs start to get smaller. In the later stages of the illness, patients may become totally paralyzed”), or you donate. I think it’s a $100. I’m going to do both. And even if you aren’t nominated or don’t have $100 to give, hopefully - at the very least - you can gain some insight about this terrible disease by checking out some of the links I provided. I will admit myself that this time last week I had no clue what ALS was. ALS hasn’t touched me personally, but I know the pain that degenerative diseases can cause. My father suffered from MS for years until his death last year. About this image: this was photographed at the end of my creative portraiture workshop in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia by the amazingly talented Jon Brown Photography (please LIKE his page….someday he will take over the photography world!!!) . The “set” was my campsite and our crew was a great group of people passionate about photography, including Curtis, Lynn, and Margaret. You all get my “nomination” to continue this. Alejandro, I’ll add you to that list.
I am generally camera adverse in the sense that one of the reasons I love being a photographer is it means that I get to stay on “that” side of the camera.

But if I’m going to show my mug, it’s going to be a good cause. I was recently “nominated” by friend Brooke Shaden Photography to participate in the #icebucketchallenge for ALS.

What is the ALS #icebucketchallenge ? Well, chances are you’ve already seen this show up on your newsfeeds. I’ve seen some amazing posts, as well as annoyed posts from people saying “so what….another internet meme….but what good does it actually do?”

Well, here’s the good that it aims to do: raise awareness about ALS, and to raise funds. ALS is a horrific disease and anything that can spread awareness and raise money for one of our world’s many terrible diseases can only be a good thing. Read more about ALS here: http://www.alsa.org/about-als/what-is-als.html

Raising money: you can make a direct donation here - https://secure.e2rm.com/registrant/LoginRegister.aspx?eventid=153928&langpref=en-CA&Referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.als.ca%2Fen%2Fdonate . Since this campaign has gone viral it’s raised over $10 million for ALS. This time last year, their total donations were under $100, 000.

The “challenge” is that if someone nominates you, you either participate in the ice bucket challenge (which is to say you get doused by ice water so you can experience, for however slight a moment, the tiniest fraction of symptoms that a sufferer of ALS suffers - which is, as The Independent Writes, “When muscles aren’t used enough, they stop working. Sufferers begin to feel weak, especially in their arms, legs, and during speech, swallowing and breathing. As muscle tissue atrophies, limbs start to get smaller. In the later stages of the illness, patients may become totally paralyzed”), or you donate. I think it’s a $100.

I’m going to do both. And even if you aren’t nominated or don’t have $100 to give, hopefully - at the very least - you can gain some insight about this terrible disease by checking out some of the links I provided. I will admit myself that this time last week I had no clue what ALS was. ALS hasn’t touched me personally, but I know the pain that degenerative diseases can cause. My father suffered from MS for years until his death last year.

About this image: this was photographed at the end of my creative portraiture workshop in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia by the amazingly talented Jon Brown Photography (please LIKE his page….someday he will take over the photography world!!!)

. The “set” was my campsite and our crew was a great group of people passionate about photography, including Curtis, Lynn, and Margaret. You all get my “nomination” to continue this. Alejandro, I’ll add you to that list.